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Number: 3172
Continent: Africa
Region: East
Place Names: Madagascar
Year of Origin: 1700 (estimated)
Title: Isle de Madagascar autrement Isle de St. Laurent
Sub-Title: [lower right margin] Tom. V. No. 11
Language: French
Publish Origin: Paris
Height: 27.7
Width: 21.6
Units: centimeters
Size Class.: Small
Scale:
Color Type: Full Color
Images of this map are not yet available.
Cartographer: Nicolas de Fer
Engraver:
Publisher:
Other Contributors:
Northernmost Latitude: -11.6
Southernmost Latitude: -26.0
Westernmost Longitude: 43.6
Easternmost Longitude: 50.75
Measurement Notes: modern Greenwich estimates
Notes: c.1646--1720; Copper print: original color; Nicolas de Fer ( 1646 - 1720 in Paris) was a French cartographer and geographer. He also was an engraver and publisher. De Fer was the youngest of three sons of Antoine de Fer, who was also a cartographer. When he was 12, he became the apprentice of Parisian engraver Louis Spirinx, and made his first map, of the Canal du Midi, at the age of 23. After the death of his father in June 1673, de Fer was so successful at improving the firm that, in 1690, he became the official geographer to Louis, Dauphin of France. With support from the Spanish and French Royal Families, de Fer also became official geographer for Philip V and Louis XIV, the kings of Spain and France, respectively. Because of this, his maps became Bourbon propaganda, endorsing French King Louis XIV.His business flourished, producing town plans, atlases, wall maps, and more than 600 sheet maps.He made maps of places in Europe and North America, including New Spain, places fortified by Vauban, the Low Countries, and the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1698, de Fer published a map of North America, which included a depiction of beavers building dams near Niagara Falls. Seventeen years later, Herman Moll published an identical map as his own, known as the -Beaver ma-. De Fer became the official geographer for His Catholic Majesty in 1720.Two of his sons-in-law, Guillaume Danet and Jaques-Fran?is B?ard, continued the company after de Fer's death on 25 October of that year until around 1760.
Last updated: May 27, 2017