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Number: 3539
Continent: Africa
Region: Central
Place Names: Congo
Year of Origin: 1885
Title: DER CONGO-STAAT UND DAS FREIHANDELSGEBIET.
Sub-Title:
Language: German
Publish Origin: Gotha
Height: 31.6
Width: 44.7
Units: centimeters
Size Class.: Medium
Scale: 1 : 12,500,000
Color Type: Outline Color
Images of this map are not yet available.
Cartographer: Hermann Habenicht
Engraver:
Publisher: Johann Georg Justus Perthes and Heirs
Other Contributors:
Northernmost Latitude: 15.5
Southernmost Latitude: -19.1
Westernmost Longitude: 0.0
Easternmost Longitude: 52.0
Measurement Notes: on map
Notes: [source Dasa Pahor] lithograph; Immediately after the Berlin Conference, This rare separately published map shows the Congo Free State existing in Central Africa from 1885 to 1908, which was in personal union with the Kingdom of Belgium under Leopold II. The state was founded in early 1885 at the Berlin conference. The map, published in April 1885, shows the newest boundaries of the Congo Free State (green), stations of the Congo Company (cities underlined with red), and free-trade territory in the Congo Basin (beige). Other colours show the German, British, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Italian colonies, as well as the Sultanate of Zanzibar. According to the text on the left-hand side the author, Hermann Habenicht, based the map on the latest available information from official sources. The borders of the Congo Free State were marked, as issued on March 5 in the Belgian magazine Le Mouvement G?graphique. The magazine was founded a year before to promote and documented Belgian colonisation of Congo. The German free trade territories are marked according to the newest information, published a month before, on March 3 in Deutscher Reichsanzeiger, the official newspaper of the German government. The north border of the Congo Free State on the map differs from the maps before. The author set the north border much lower, following the (false) discovery by the Russian explorer Wilhelm Junker (1840 ?1892) rather than the new survey by Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904). Junker claimed the river Uele (Welle) was joining the river Chari in the north, which flows to the Lake Chad. Stanley on the other hand correctly established the Uele joins the Mbomou River at Yakoma. The cartographer Hermann Habenicht was at the same time also making a draft for a 10 sheet wall map of Africa. Hermann Habenicht Hermann Habenicht (1844-1917) was a German cartographer, active in the Gotha Geographic Office. Schooled by a famous map-maker August Petermann since he was 15 years old, he soon took over the drafts for map reliefs for publications such as Stielers Hand-Atlas, and eventually specialised for non-European cartography. In 1885, the same year as this map, Habenicht started working on a 10 sheet wall map of Africa, which was published the following year with a title Justus Perthes? Spezialkarte von Afrika. Habenicht was a teacher of Hermann Haack, one of the most influential German map-makers of the 20th century. One of the first separately issued maps of the Congo Free State and its free-trade territories, made by the Gotha Geographical Office for the German trade in the colonies in Africa. Author: Hermann HABENICHT (1844-1917). Place and Year: Gotha: Justus Perthes, April 1885. Technique: Lithography in colour, 53 x 40,5 cm (20.8 x 15.9 inches) ;This rare separately published map shows the Congo Free State, a state in Central Africa from 1885 to 1908, which was in personal union with the Kingdom of Belgium under Leopold II. The state was founded in early 1885 at the Berlin conference. The map, published in April 1885, shows the newest boundaries of the Congo Free State (green), stations of the Congo Company (cities underlined with red), and free-trade territory in the Congo Basin (beige). Other colours show the German, British, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Italian colonies, as well as the Sultanate of Zanzibar. According to the text on the left-hand side the author, Hermann Habenicht, based the map on the latest available information from official sources. The borders of the Congo Free State were marked, as issued on March 5 in the Belgian magazine Le Mouvement G?graphique. The magazine was founded a year before to promote and documented Belgian colonisation of Congo. The German free trade territories are marked according to the newest information, published a month before, on March 3 in Deutscher Reichsanzeiger, the official newspaper of the German government. The north border of the Congo Free State on the map differs from the maps before. The author set the north border much lower, following the (false) discovery by the Russian explorer Wilhelm Junker (1840 ?1892) rather than the new survey by Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904). Junker claimed the river Uele (Welle) was joining the river Chari in the north, which flows to the Lake Chad. Stanley on the other hand correctly established the Uele joins the Mbomou River at Yakoma. The cartographer Hermann Habenicht was at the same time also making a draft for a 10 sheet wall map of Africa. Hermann Habenicht Hermann Habenicht (1844-1917) was a German cartographer, active in the Gotha Geographic Office. Schooled by a famous map-maker August Petermann since he was 15 years old, he soon took over the drafts for map reliefs for publications such as Stielers Hand-Atlas, and eventually specialised for non-European cartography. In 1885, the same year as this map, Habenicht started working on a 10 sheet wall map of Africa, which was published the following year with a title Justus Perthes? Spezialkarte von Afrika. Habenicht was a teacher of Hermann Haack, one of the most influential German map-makers of the 20th century.
Last updated: May 20, 2019